The Reese Brothers Mule Farm

farmsTHE REESE FAMILY MULE FARM

Dick Reese is a fourth-generation farmer in a unique family business established in 1792 when his great-grandfather Charles Reese moved to Sumner County and married Polly Deshea, an original Nashville settler. [READ MORE HISTORY]

The Reese family has supplied pack mules to the Grand Canyon National Park since the 1920s. Each year the Reese Brothers hold auctions for thousands of potential buyers traveling from all over the country. At any one auction the brothers sell between 100-450 mules for show and trail, draft mules for work and show, and pack or wagon mules.

In December 2015, Dick Reese protected his piece of Tennessee history–his 320-acre farm. It contains prime agricultural soils along a critical water source and a beautiful stretch along iconic Tennessee back roads. Reese will continue his life’s work and hand his beloved land down to the next generation, his two sons, knowing it will remain undeveloped and that their family’s heritage will remain intact forever.

 

[READ MORE about this farming family: Reese-Bros-Mules, an article by Patrick Smith for TELCO Magazine]

Conservation Values:

  • OPEN SPACE PROTECTION
      • The conservation of the Dick Reese Farm follows the goals for protection of specific natural spaces in the Sumner County Comprehensive Growth Plan
      • For the scenic enjoyment of the general public and will yield a significant public benefit:
        • Significant Water Source: Over two miles of stream frontage along Dry Fork which drains into Bledsoe Creek, and in turn, Old Hickory Lake of the Cumberland River
        • Scenic Tennessee Landscape: Nearly a mile of road frontage along Dry Fork Road South and Rock Bridge Road
        • Prime Agricultural Soils: Property contains 38% (125.1 acres) prime farmland soils (The Reese family’s secondary operation is growing row crops, including corn, wheat, soybeans and tobacco)
        • Tennessee History & Heritage: Eligible for Century Farm Status (defined as a working farm handed down int he family for over 100 years)

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